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Web Camera Images


Capture Notes: Philips SPC900 NC web camera, unless otherwise indicated, with an IR blocking filter. 8 inch Meade LXD55 SCT and 3X barlow. K3CCDTools version 1 was used to record the videos unless otherwise indicated. Camera settings recorded with WcCrtl unless otherwise indicated.
Processing Notes: Final processing has been done using Registax version 4 was used for stacking, Astra Image for removing diagonal bands through Fast Fourier Transform edits and for applying deconvolution. PhotoShop CS2 or Paint Shop Pro 9 have been used for adjusting levels, curves and color, while Neat Image is used for digital noise removal.


February 17, 2012 at 0:47 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 300 frames stacked. Seeing was average (~3 out of 5). Angular diameter 37.3".

February 7, 2012 at 0:53 UT.

Io is visible in the far left of the image while Europa is visible just to the left (east) of the planet. The Great Red Spot is just beginning to come into view on the eastern side of the planet's disk. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 300 frames stacked. Seeing was average to good (~3 to 4 out of 5). Angular diameter 38.4".

January 15, 2012 at 0:32 UT.

Europa is visible in the far right of the image while Europa's shadow is visible near the western limb of the planet. Red Spot Junior is visible on the eastern side of the planet's disk. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 325 frames stacked. Seeing was average (~3 out of 5). Angular diameter 41.4".

January 11, 2012 at 0:23 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 300 frames stacked. Seeing was very good (~4 out of 5). Angular diameter 41.9".

January 10, 2012 at 0:38 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible on the right. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 300 frames stacked. Seeing was average (~3 out of 5). Angular diameter 42.1".

January 06, 2012 at 0:25 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 225 frames stacked. Seeing was poor (~2 out of 5). Angular diameter 42.6".

January 05, 2012 at 0:51 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 300 frames stacked. Seeing was average (~3 out of 5). Angular diameter 42.8".

December 26, 2011 at 1:40 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 200 frames stacked. Seeing was average (~3 out of 5). Angular diameter 44.2".

December 18, 2011 at 1:43 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 200 frames stacked. Seeing was poor (~2 of 5). Angular diameter 45.3".

December 17, 2011 at 2:04 UT.

Red Spot Jr. is visible in this image at the lower left of Jupiter. Ganymede is visible to the upper right of Jupiter. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 300 frames stacked. Seeing was average to good (~3 to 4 out of 5). Angular diameter 45.5".

December 11, 2011 at 2:40 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 200 frames stacked. Seeing was poor to average (~2 to 3 out of 5). Angular diameter 46.3".

December 08, 2011 at 2:53 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 40%. 400 frames stacked. Seeing was good to excellent (~4 to 4.5 out of 5). Angular diameter 46.7".

November 24, 2011 at 2:31 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 38%. 75 frames stacked. Seeing was very poor to poor (~1 to 2 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.2".

October 05, 2011 at 7:12 UT.

Red Spot Jr. is visible in the lower center. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 225 frames stacked. Seeing was poor to average (~2 to 3 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.7".

October 04, 2011 at 7:02 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible in the center. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 175 frames stacked. Seeing was poor to average (~2 to 3 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.6".

October 03, 2011 at 6:57 UT.

Io is visible to the left of Jupiter and Ganymede is visible to the lower right of Jupiter. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 250 frames stacked. Seeing was good (~4 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.5".

October 02, 2011 at 7:27 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 40%. 200 frames stacked. Seeing was good (~4 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.4".

October 01, 2011 at 7:45 UT.

Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 40%. 250 frames stacked. Seeing was average (~3 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.3".

September 29, 2011 at 8:54 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible in this image at the lower center of Jupiter. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 40%. 375 frames stacked. Seeing was excellent (~4.5 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.2".

September 28, 2011 at 8:24 UT.

Red Spot Jr. is visible in this image at the lower right of Jupiter. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 41%. 550 frames stacked. Seeing ranged from average to excellent (~3 to 4.5 out of 5). Angular diameter 48.1".

September 20, 2011 at 9:08 UT.

Red Spot Jr. is visible in this image at the lower right of Jupiter. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 40%. 175 frames stacked. Seeing was poor (~2 out of 5). Angular diameter 47.2".

August 25, 2011 at 10:50 UT.

Red Spot Jr. is visible in this image at the lower right of Jupiter. Io and its shadow are visible in the lower left. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: 38%. 325 frames stacked. Seeing was very good (~4 out of 5). Transparency was good (~4 out of 5). Angular diameter 43.8".

August 21, 2011 at 10:22 UT.

The Great Red Spot is visible in this image. Ganymede is visible to the lower right of Jupiter. Camera settings: 1/33 second exposure, brightness: 50%, gamma 0%, saturation 100%, gain: ~50%. 400 frames stacked. Camera settings are from memory. (I forgot to record the settings. Besides, I had to constantly change the gain due to the cirrus clouds.) Seeing was good (~4 out of 5). Transparency was poor (~2 out of 5). Angular diameter 43.3".